New

Adella Hunt-Logan

Adella Hunt-Logan

Adella Hunt, the daughter of a black woman, was born in Sparta, Georgia, in February, 1863. Her father, Henry Hunt, a white farmer, served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. He did not live with his eight children but he did help to pay for Adella to be educated at Sparta's Bass Academy and Atlanta University.

In 1883 Adella taught at the American Missionary School before joining Booker T. Washington and Olivia Davidson at the Tuskegee Institute. She taught English and Social Sciences and served as Tuskegee's first librarian.

Adella married Warren Logan, a fellow teacher at the Tuskegee Institute in 1888. Over the next few years she gave birth to nine children. However, only six survived to adulthood.

A strong supporter of women's suffrage, Adella led monthly discussions on the subject at the Tuskegee Woman's Club. She also amassed a large library of reading materials about suffrage. She also lectured at regional and national conferences of the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs. Adella also wrote about women's rights in Crisis, a journal produced by William Du Bois and the National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People (NAACP).

Adella fell ill in 1915 and was admitted to Battle Creek Sanitarium for treatment. She returned to the Tuskegee Institute after hearing that Booker T. Washington was seriously ill. Adella's depression increased after the death of Washington and on 12th December, 1915, she jumped to her death from the top floor of one of the school's buildings.


Herb Boyd | 8/20/2020, midnight

Organizations and institutions around the nation are in preparation for the centennial celebration of the Women’s Suffragette movement. On Aug. 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment was ratified granting women the right to vote. It was a momentous occasion and often lost in the celebrations was the significant role Black women played in the movement.

One of the lesser known women was Adella Hunt who later married Warren Logan. Born in slavery in 1863 in Sparta, Georgia, Adella was the daughter of a white planter and an African American mother. She was the fourth of eight children and was provided with an education at Bass Academy, becoming a certified teacher at sixteen. After the Civil War she earned a scholarship to Atlanta University where she attended Upper Normal College. In 1881, the same year Tuskegee Institute was founded by Booker T. Washington, Adella completed a two-year program, graduated and began teaching in Albany, Georgia at an American Missionary Association primary school.

She joined the Tuskegee Institute faculty in 1883 and five years later married Logan, who was also a teacher at the Institute. Adella taught English and other subjects in the humanities and social sciences, and was the school’s first librarian, serving as well as the “Lady Principal” for a short time. Meanwhile, she forged an enduring warm relationship with Washington. Her husband, like her, was of mixed-race born in Virginia and gained his education after the Emancipation. Over the years at the Institute he would ascend to various leadership positions, along with his duties as principal, treasurer and eventually even a co-executor of Washington’s estate.

Between 1890 and 1909, the couple had nine children, six of whom survived to adulthood. Their youngest son became a surgeon in New York City and one of his offspring was Adele Logan Alexander, who earned her doctorate and later taught at George Washington University. Among her books was a volume devoted to the history of African Americans.

Despite a household of many children, Adella was a devout teacher and held memberships in several important organizations, including the Tuskegee Woman’s Club, an affiliate of the National Association of Colored Women (NACW). She was a versatile and tireless advocate of prison reform, health care and insuring the literacy of Black Americans. But her concern and interest in acquiring universal suffrage consumed most of her waking hours. “In 1895 the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) held a convention in Atlanta. Due to the difficulty NAWSA was having gaining passage for a constitutional amendment on women’s suffrage, the organization was looking for support from southern states. NAWSA appealed to white southerners, it “observed state Jim Crow segregation and turned away African American women and men from the convention,” according to one publication that chronicled the event.

Because of her light complexion, Adella was able to gain admission to the convention and was deeply inspired by a speech delivered by Susan B. Anthony. Subsequently, she became a member of the NAWSA and campaigned energetically in Alabama and was also a writer for the organization’s newspaper The Woman’s Journal. Her article about the NAWSA appeared in the NAACP’s The Crisis in September 1912, highlighting the role of Black women in the suffrage movement. “The colored American believes in equal justice to all,” she wrote in the article, “regardless of race, color, creed or sex, and longs for the day when the United States shall indeed have a government of the people, for the people and by the people—even including the colored people.” This was just one of several articles she penned for The Crisis. Her work was also published in the Colored American magazine. Her argument was that Black women deserved the vote, particularly for what they could contribute to overall education and legislation battles in the nation.

Soon, she was widely recognized for her determination to win the vote for women of all colors and found many creative and innovative ways to promote that aim, including participation in parades, lantern slide nights and musical concerts to raise funds. Gaining the vote, too, she believed would be helpful in impeding the abuse and rape visited upon women, and this was an issue that was of critical importance among African American women.

In the fall of 1915, Adella was perturbed by setbacks in the suffrage movement and the personal issues in her marriage left her deeply troubled. These problems, at last, proved a heavy burden and she was committed to a sanitarium in Michigan for treatment. Her conditions were exacerbated with the announcement that her close friend, Booker T. Washington, had died in November. This plunged her even deeper into depression. A month later, on Dec. 10, she committed suicide by leaping from the top floor of a building on the Tuskegee campus.

Five years after her death, the 19th Amendment was ratified, effectively giving women the right to vote. Her legacy is now being recalled, at least by those who have devoted an abiding concern with suffrage, though she may not appear at the top of the list of the many Black women in the movement.


--> Logan, Adella Hunt, 1863-1915

Adella Hunt Logan (February 10, 1863 – December 10, 1915) was an African-American writer, educator, administrator and suffragist. Born during the Civil War, she earned her teaching credentials at Atlanta University, an historically black college founded by the American Missionary Association. She became a teacher at the Tuskegee Institute and became an activist for education and suffrage for women of color. As part of her advocacy, she published articles in some of the most noted black periodicals of her time.

Hunt Logan is best known for her activist work. Her main interest was education advocacy, seen especially in her work at Tuskegee. In 1895, Hunt Logan joined the Tuskegee Woman's Club, which became an affiliate of the National Association of Colored Women (NACW) a year later. The Tuskegee chapter worked to improve the lives of African Americans in local communities. Hunt Logan worked specifically in programs aimed to improve health care, as well as advocating for prison reform and running a lending library as a member of the NACW club.

One of Hunt Logan's educational goals was to prepare individuals for universal suffrage. In 1895 the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) held a convention in Atlanta. Due to the difficulty NAWSA was having gaining passage for a constitutional amendment on women's suffrage, the organization was looking for support from southern states. Although NAWSA was appealed to white southerners, it observed state Jim Crow segregation and turned away African-American women and men from the convention. Mississippi had already passed a new constitution to disenfranchise blacks, and other southern states completed similar actions in this period, through 1908. This was the atmosphere in which Hunt Logan arrived at the convention. Hunt Logan was able to hear Susan B. Anthony speak, and despite the racism which she and other African Americans had to contend with at the convention, Hunt Logan became a member of the NAWSA after being inspired by Anthony's speech.

Hunt Logan campaigned for women's suffrage in Alabama and wrote for NAWSA's newspaper, The Woman's Journal. In September 1912, Hunt Logan contributed an article to the magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), The Crisis, as a part of a special issue on women's suffrage. She argued for the right to vote, specifically for women of color. She pointed to the success of women's voting in many western states that had statewide suffrage and argued,
. the colored American believes in equal justice to all, regardless of race, color, creed or sex, and longs for the day when the United States shall indeed have a government of the people, for the people and by the people—even including the colored people.

On December 12, 1915 Adella Hunt Logan passed away in Tuskegee, Alabama at the age of 52.


From The Reading List

New York Times: "Opinion: The 19th Amendment: An Important Milestone in an Unfinished Journey" &mdash "Historians who specialize in voting rights and African-American women’s history have played a welcome and unusually public role in combating the myths that have long surrounded the women’s suffrage movement and the 19th Amendment, which celebrates its 100th anniversary on Tuesday."

Wall Street Journal: "Black Women’s Long Struggle for Voting Rights" &mdash "On March 3, 1913, the day before Woodrow Wilson’s presidential inauguration, more than 5,000 women gathered in Washington, D.C. for a “suffrage parade” demanding the right to vote."

Washington Post: "Women’s suffrage was a giant leap for democracy. We haven’t stuck the landing yet." &mdash "The House delayed the vote as long as it could."

NBC News: "Women's suffrage myths and the lesser known women suffragists" &mdash "This year marks 100 years since the passage of the 19th amendment, which sought to guarantee all American women the right to vote."

Minnesota Star Tribune: "100 years later, today's activists can learn from suffrage movement" &mdash "The fact that voting rights are still so contested today — from Georgia’s purge of its voter rolls in 2018 to the debate over mail-in ballots during the COVID-19 pandemic — speaks to just how powerful the vote remains in U.S. politics."

New York Times: "100 Years Later, These Activists Continue Their Ancestors’ Work" &mdash "Black Lives Matter protesters violently cleared by federal forces from Lafayette Square this June were the latest Americans to bring their demand for justice to the doorstep of a sitting president."

PBS NewsHour: "100 years after women’s suffrage, work remains in achieving equality" &mdash "This week it will be 100 years since the 19th Amendment was passed, giving women in America the hard-fought right to vote."

Smithsonian Magazine: "How the 19th Amendment Complicated the Status and Role of Women in Hawai’i" &mdash "When the 19th Amendment was finally ratified on August 18, 1920, some women in Hawaiʻi wasted no time in submitting their names to fill seats in government."

This program aired on August 18, 2020.


Princess of the Hither Isles: A Black Suffragist’s Story from the Jim Crow South An Evening with Author Adele Logan Alexander

Born during the Civil War into an affluent family of mixed race—black, white, and Native American—Adella Hunt Logan became a key figure in the fight for voting rights, especially for women of color. An intimate friend of Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver, an acquaintance and sometime sparring partner of Susan B. Anthony and W.E.B. Du Bois, Adella Hunt Logan was often at the forefront of the battle for racial and gender equality.

In Princess of the Hither Isles: A Black Suffragist’s Story from the Jim Crow South, esteemed historian Adele Logan Alexander, who is Adella Hunt Logan’s grand-daughter, brings this extraordinary woman to life. Alexander has written a category-defying work of history and literary imagination, blending decades of historical research with family lore and inherited knowledge to create a vivid portrait of a little-known woman of exceptional impact.

As a highly educated woman who looked white, considered herself black, and was deeply influenced by her Cherokee grandmother, Adella Hunt Logan both defied and epitomized America’s complex racial story. Alexander recreates Adella Hunt Logan’s sprawling family, whose lives expose, undermine, upend, ignore, and sometimes reinforce the racial ideologies that enmesh them.

The book teems with influential figures—Theodore Roosevelt, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Nella Larson, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Sigmund Freud—whose lives and ideas intersect with Adella Hunt Logan’s. These characters are joined by her remarkable family members and friends—a part Cherokee woman whose dramatic rescue of her white-looking African-American son involves a redolent diaper, a hatpin, and a forged document a white judge in charge of the census who agonizes over whether and how to record his beloved mixed-race daughters a girl educated at the all-white Emma Willard School who comes to know her black family after her heritage is vengefully revealed and dozens more. Brutality, love, coercion, empathy, jealousy, violence, loss, achievement, creativity, and courage commingle in this intergenerational chronicle of an extraordinary American family.

Grounded in research and beautifully told, Adella Hunt Logan’s story provides a singular perspective on aspects of American history that are profoundly relevant in our own time:

Adella’s public and private debates—with Susan B. Anthony over racial equality and with Booker T. Washington over gender equality—give us a personal sense of the long and exhausting battle, especially for women of color, against discrimination.

Adella’s central role in the early years of the Tuskegee Institute and her active participation in debates surrounding the mission of America’s historically black colleges and universities offer a new avenue for understanding these institutions.

Adella’s tireless insistence that women of color be included in the quest for suffrage, and her risky efforts to pursue that goal—from passing as white to attend suffrage conventions to publicly defying her husband in her writings—provide new examples of resistance and courage.

Adella’s struggle to balance motherhood, marriage, a demanding career, and a compelling moral mission resonates with the challenges faced by today’s women.

Adella’s grappling with issues related to women’s right to control their own bodies provides insight into the workings of gender, race, and power in American history.

Throughout her dramatic life, Adella Hunt Logan remained powerfully committed to both scholarship and equality (a legacy continued in one of her best-known descendants, the author’s daughter, poet Elizabeth Alexander). Sparkling with detail and informed by Adele Logan Alexander’s deep personal connection to its protagonist, Princess of the Hither Isles,seamlessly blends the tools of both the historian and the storyteller to unveil deep truths about lives too often concealed by history.

Adele Logan Alexander taught for eighteen years at George Washington University. Her publications include Ambiguous Lives: Free Women of Color in Rural Georgia and Homelands and Waterways: The American Journey of the Bond Family, 1846–1926.

View the Zoom video recording here:


Adella Hunt Logan

This portrait of Hunt Logan by the Parisian-trained, African-American painter William Edouard Scott, was begun in 1915 while he was in residence at Tuskegee and completed at her daughter’s direction in 1918.
Portrait from Adele Logan Alexander’s personal collection


This portrait of Hunt Logan by the Parisian-trained, African-American painter William Edouard Scott, was begun in 1915 while he was in residence at Tuskegee and completed at her daughter’s direction in 1918.
Portrait from Adele Logan Alexander’s personal collection

Soon after meeeting Susan B. Anthony in 1895 at a convention of the National-American Woman Suffrage Association (N-AWSA) in Atlanta, Adella Hunt Logan wrote to the suffragist leader, “I am working with women who are slow to believe that they will get help from the ballot, but someday I hope to see my daughter vote right here in the South.” She strove to spur often frightened or otherwise reluctant black women to political action through gaining access to the ballot she lobbied for equal pay as well, and ultimately espoused women’s reproductive rights.

The letter and Hunt Logan herself were virtually unique, because in her own eyes, and as specified by law, she was “a Negro.” Due to her predominantly Caucasian ancestry, however (both her mother and her black-Cherokee-white maternal grandmother maintained longstanding, consensual relationships with slaveholding white men), Hunt Logan herself looked white. As an adult, she occasionally “passed” to travel on the Jim Crow South’s railways, and to attend segregated political gatherings, such as the N-AWSA’s, from which she brought suffrage tactics and materials back to share with her own people. At the time, she was the N-AWSA’s only African-American lifetime member, and the only such member from ultraconservative Alabama, where she lived with her husband, Warren Logan, and their children, and taught for three decades at Booker T. Washington’s Tuskegee Institute, the agricultural and industrial school for black Southerners that drew such prominent visitors as Frederick Douglass, Presidents William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt, and philanthropists Andrew Carnegie and Julius Rosenwald.


Hunt Logan in June 1901, after earning her “honorary” master’s degree from Atlanta University
Collection of the author reproduction photograph by Mark Gulezian

Hunt Logan was also a woman of rare privilege and education. She’d first been tutored by a white cousin, a schoolteacher. She graduated at 18 from Atlanta University, where dedicated New Englanders taught a small cadre of black Southerners, and 20 years later she earned a master’s there—“honorary” only, though, because no school for African Americans anywhere in the country then was accredited to bestow “earned” graduate degrees.

Her interactions with Anthony continued, despite a fractious incident in 1900. A white friend and fellow suffragist suggested that Hunt Logan speak at a Washington, D.C., convention honoring Anthony’s eightieth birthday, noting, “her hair is as straight as yours or mine and she looks white but must call herself colored.” But Anthony demurred: “I cannot have speak for us a woman who has even a ten-thousandth portion of African blood who would be an inferior orator in matter or manner, because it would so mitigate against our cause…Let your Miss Logan wait till she is more cultivated, better educated, and better prepared and can do our mission and her own race the greatest credit.”

Despite that affront, Hunt Logan cajoled white suffragists, Anthony among them, into visiting Tuskegee, and contributed to the N-AWSA’s Woman’s Journal, where in 1901 (using the pseudonym “L.H.A.”) she wrote about “Mrs. Warren Logan’s” recent public presentation on suffrage for black women. She wrote for other publications as well, including a notable 1905 article about woman suffrage in the Colored American, the country’s most widely read journal by, for, and about African Americans. “If we are citizens,” she asked, “why not treat us as such on questions of law and governance where women are now classed with minors and idiots?” To those who argued that men represented their wives at the polls, she argued that many of her sex either had no spouses or had “callous husbands who patronize gambling dens and brothels.” Such women, she concluded, often stayed home, “to cry, to swear, or to suicide.”

In 1912, in “Colored Women as Voters,” written for W.E.B. Du Bois’s popular new NAACP magazine, The Crisis, she argued in part, “More and more colored women are participating in civic activities, and women who believe that they need the vote, also see that the vote needs them.” But by then, she was already physically ill—from long-term, painful, and debilitating kidney infections—and increasingly depressed, a condition due partly to marital and family stress, but aggravated by outside events. Du Bois, though Hunt Logan’s friend, was Booker T. Washington’s philosophical archenemy, and he failed to request a contribution from her for his second issue of The Crisis to be devoted to woman suffrage. Early in 1915, the Alabama legislature had refused to allow a referendum on votes for women even to appear on that fall’s ballot. Enforced electroshock treatment at Michigan’s Battle Creek Sanitarium, after she’d set a small fire in her husband’s office, was cut short that November following Washington’s death.

She returned to find a campus deep in mourning, and to face rumors of her husband’s infidelity. Just before Washington’s December memorial service, she jumped to her death from the fifth floor of a campus building before hundreds of appalled onlookers—as perhaps she’d prophesied in her 1905 suffrage article.

Despite her struggles, Hunt Logan boldly challenged the status quo and conventional wisdom about politically empowering African-American women. Ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920 officially granted women the right to vote, but Southern black women, her main constituency, largely had to wait until passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act to exercise the franchise.

Historian Adele Logan Alexander ’59 is Adella Hunt Logan’s only granddaughter. Her family memoir Princess of the Hither Isles: A Black Suffragist’s Story from the Jim Crow South (Yale), appears this month. The portrait of Hunt Logan above, by the Parisian-trained, African-American painter William Edouard Scott, was begun in 1915 while he was in residence at Tuskegee and completed at her daughter’s direction in 1918.


Adella Hunt Logan

Daughter of Capt. Henry Alexander (C.S.A.) and Mariah "Cherokee Mariah Lilly" (Hunt) Hunt, Sr.

Their son, Dr. Arthur C. Logan, b. ca. 1905-1973 (m. 1st., Wenonah Bond and 2nd., Marian Bruce, b. 1919-Nov. 25, 1993)

Arthur and Wenonah (Bond) Logan were the parents of Adele Logan (m. Clifford Alexander, Jr., b. 1933).

Adella Hunt, the daughter of a black woman, was born in Sparta, Georgia, in February, 1863. Her father, Henry Alexander Hunt, Sr., a white farmer, served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. He did not live with his eight children but he did help to pay for Adella to be educated at Sparta's Bass Academy and Atlanta University.

In 1883 Adella taught at the American Missionary School before joining Booker T. Washington and Olivia Davidson at the Tuskegee Institute. She taught English and Social Sciences and served as Tuskegee's first librarian.

Adella married Warren Logan, a fellow teacher at the Tuskegee Institute in 1888. Over the next few years she gave birth to nine children. However, only six survived to adulthood.

A strong supporter of women's suffrage, Adella led monthly discussions on the subject at the Tuskegee Woman's Club. She also amassed a large library of reading materials about suffrage. She also lectured at regional and national conferences of the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs. Adella also wrote about women's rights in Crisis, a journal produced by William Du Bois and the National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People (NAACP).

Adella fell ill in 1915 and was admitted to Battle Creek Sanitarium for treatment. She returned to the Tuskegee Institute after hearing that Booker T. Washington was seriously ill. Adella's depression increased after the death of Washington and on 12th December, 1915, she jumped to her death from the top floor of one of the school's buildings.

Ambiguous Lives, Free Women of Color in Rural Georgia 1789 - 1879 (1991).


African-American suffragist promotes suffrage as a way of upholding citizenship rights and to protect herself, and her family, from violence.

Daughter of slave and a white slave owner who saw to her education at Atlanta University, Adella Hunt Logan became a professor at Booker T. Washington’s Tuskegee Institute. As a member of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), she promoted suffrage as a way of stopping violence against women.

In this excerpt from an article in The Crisis, the official magazine of the NAACP, Logan notes lacking the right to vote prevents women from being whole citizens. Additionally, the vote allows African-American women to advocate on behalf of their families, notably mentioning education and the black population’s tense relationship with police officers. As victims of racism and sexism, Black women had much at stake in political participation.


The Fight to Vote: The Untold Story

2020 has already been a year of history-making events, and this week, another will be Kamala Harris&rsquos official nomination as the vice presidential candidate on the Democratic national ticket.

Appropriately, given the historical significance of this year as the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment which gave the right to vote to white women, Kamala Harris remarked in an interview last week:

&ldquoWhen I think about the centennial and the importance of acknowledging the accomplishment &hellip there&rsquos a lot to celebrate, but also it should motivate us to be clear-eyed about how much work still needs to be done.&rdquo

Work begins by honestly recalling and reviewing the history of the struggle for voting rights with 20/20 vision. We should be clear-eyed and accurate, putting forward the truth that in this movement and other social justice movements, women of color were organizing, supporting one another and working for change, and all too often, white women didn&rsquot join them in their struggles.

&ldquoWhat if Black women, it turned out, really always have been at the forefront of the struggles over American women&rsquos voting rights, and what if we as a nation are just catching up to that?&rdquo

&mdash Dr. Martha S. Jones, historian and author.

Even the most informed among us, are catching up to a lot we didn&rsquot know, learn or celebrate until now. Writer Marianne Schnall, in acknowledging the extent to which history books systematically erase women and their contributions to history, notes that &ldquoless than 3 percent of the words in history textbooks are specifically about women and only 5 percent of all images of historic figures are women of color.&rdquo

This is just one of many important facts becoming more well known because of a new project, &ldquoTruth Be Told&ldquo&mdasha digital collection of historical portraits and artifacts funded by Melinda Gates&rsquoa Pivotal Ventures&mdashthat tells a more inclusive story of the women&rsquos suffrage movement.

&ldquoIf white American women, with all their natural and acquired advantages, need the ballot, that right protective of all other rights if Anglo Saxons have been helped by it &hellip how much more do Black Americans, male and female, need the strong defense of a vote to help secure them their right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness?&rdquo

&mdashAdella Hunt Logan

This is why, as we celebrate 100 years of white women voting this month, it&rsquos important to unlearn what we were taught in school and seek out the truth about what really did happen. And a great place to start is with the &ldquo Truth Be Told &rdquo digital collection.

You&rsquoll learn how Black women leaders such as Sojourner Truth, Frances E.W. Harper, Mary Church Terrell, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin and Ida B. Wells-Barnett Chinese suffragist Mabel Ping-Hua Lee and Latinx organizer Nina Otero-Warren, were sidelined by the white women leaders, who believed their cause would gain more support if women of color were excluded.

&ldquoA white woman has only one handicap to overcome&mdashthat of sex. I have two&mdashboth sex and race. &hellip Colored men have only one&mdashthat of race. Colored women are the only group in this country who have two heavy handicaps to overcome, that of race as well as that of sex.&rdquo

&mdashMary Church Terrell

Two important new podcasts out this month also begin to tell the full story of women&rsquos suffrage: &ldquoShe Votes!,&rdquo hosted by journalists Ellen Goodman and Lynn Sherr. Having lived through&mdashand covered&mdashfeminism&rsquos second-wave, Goodman and Sherr recount stories that include the first demands to speak on public matters by antislavery activists in 1837, the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention for Women&rsquos Rights, and up to the drama of the final passage in 1920 and beyond to the impact of women as voters on elections.

Another important podcast focused on women&rsquos history also launched this month is &ldquoAnd Nothing Less: The Untold Stories of Women&rsquos Fight for the Vote,&rdquo co-hosted by actors/activists Rosario Dawson and Retta. They explore the array of diverse voices beyond Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, sharing the stories of generations of activists who fought for full access to the ballot. Guests will include historian Dr. Martha S. Jones, author of &ldquoVanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All,&rdquo journalist Elaine Weiss, who wrote &ldquoThe Woman&rsquos Hour,&rdquo and Michelle Duster, the great-granddaughter of suffragist and civil rights icon Ida B. Wells.

While it&rsquos true that the 19th Amendment, ratified August 18, 1920, made it illegal for states to deny the ballot to women based on their sex, it didn&rsquot guarantee their right to vote.

&ldquoTremendous amounts of talent are being lost to our society just because that talent wears a skirt.&rdquo

&mdashShirley Chisholm

&ldquoWomen would still have to navigate a maze of state laws&mdashbased upon age, citizenship, residency, mental competence, and more&mdashthat might keep them from the polls. The women who showed up to register to vote in the fall of 1920 confronted many hurdles. Racism was the most significant one,&rdquo writes Dr. Martha S. Jones.

Universal suffrage wasn&rsquot secured until 1965 with the passage of the Voting Rights Act (VRA). And sadly in the 21st century, the right to vote is under threat once again. In the past 20 years, the Supreme Court has weakened the VRA and many states have &ldquoput barriers in front of the ballot box &mdash imposing strict voter ID laws, cutting voting times, restricting registration, and purging voter rolls.&rdquo

Which brings us to 2020, in the middle of a pandemic that raises health and safety concerns for in-person voting, and a president actively undermining the process for voting by mail. It&rsquos important to check your registration status, learn about absentee and early voting in your state, or even register to vote if you need to do that.

&ldquoI do not think the mere extension of the ballot a panacea for all the ills of our national life. What we need today is not simply more voters, but better voters.&rdquo

&mdashFrances E.W. Harper

This November, we not only have a woman running for vice president&mdashthe first woman of color on a Democratic party ticket&mdashbut we also have a record number of women running for Congress, surpassing the record set during the 2018 midterms. Advocacy groups, including Time&rsquos Up, EMILY&rsquos List, Planned Parenthood, Supermajority, NARAL, She the People, Higher Heights for America and others, have been mobilizing to proactively combat the sexism and racism that negatively impact women running for political office.

Last week&rsquos #WeHaveHerBack Twitter campaign shone a spotlight on what president and CEO of Time&rsquos Up Now Tina Tchen calls the &ldquounfair coverage, double standards, and coded language that have held women&mdashand especially women of color&mdashfrom positions of power, across party lines, for far too long.&rdquo

A lot is at stake in November 2020 to fulfill the promises of August 1920 (19th Amendment) and of August 1965 (The Voting Rights Act).

For me, this feels like the time to Woman UP!&mdashto show up, speak up, step up, stand up for one another and for the democratic values that every vote counts and every voter matters.


100 Years Later: The Complicated History Of The Women's Suffrage Movement

We look back at the last century of voting and examine how women and women of color have impacted our politics.

Guests

Errin Haines, editor-at-large for The 19th, a nonprofit news organization reporting at the intersection of gender, politics and policy. ( @emarvelous)

Lisa Tetrault, professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, specializing in the history of U.S. women and gender. Author of “ The Myth of Seneca Falls.” ( @LisaTetrault2)

Adele Logan Alexander, granddaughter of African American suffragist Adella Hunt Logan. She taught history for many years at George Washington University. Author of “ Princess of the Hither Isles.”

From The Reading List

New York Times: “ Opinion: The 19th Amendment: An Important Milestone in an Unfinished Journey” — “Historians who specialize in voting rights and African-American women’s history have played a welcome and unusually public role in combating the myths that have long surrounded the women’s suffrage movement and the 19th Amendment, which celebrates its 100th anniversary on Tuesday.”

Wall Street Journal: “ Black Women’s Long Struggle for Voting Rights” — “On March 3, 1913, the day before Woodrow Wilson’s presidential inauguration, more than 5,000 women gathered in Washington, D.C. for a “suffrage parade” demanding the right to vote.”

NBC News: “ Women’s suffrage myths and the lesser known women suffragists” — “This year marks 100 years since the passage of the 19th amendment, which sought to guarantee all American women the right to vote.”

Minnesota Star Tribune: “ 100 years later, today’s activists can learn from suffrage movement” — “The fact that voting rights are still so contested today — from Georgia’s purge of its voter rolls in 2018 to the debate over mail-in ballots during the COVID-19 pandemic — speaks to just how powerful the vote remains in U.S. politics.”

New York Times: “ 100 Years Later, These Activists Continue Their Ancestors’ Work” — “Black Lives Matter protesters violently cleared by federal forces from Lafayette Square this June were the latest Americans to bring their demand for justice to the doorstep of a sitting president.”

PBS NewsHour: “ 100 years after women’s suffrage, work remains in achieving equality” — “This week it will be 100 years since the 19th Amendment was passed, giving women in America the hard-fought right to vote.”

Smithsonian Magazine: “ How the 19th Amendment Complicated the Status and Role of Women in Hawai’i” — “When the 19th Amendment was finally ratified on August 18, 1920, some women in Hawaiʻi wasted no time in submitting their names to fill seats in government.”


Watch the video: The Life Of Adella Hunt Logan. See My Strength (January 2022).

Video, Sitemap-Video, Sitemap-Videos